mayaoishiina:

fieryredsam:

the science building in my university has PERIODIC TABLES

if two people sat at that table for a romantic dinner they would be carbon dating

mayaoishiina:

fieryredsam:

the science building in my university has PERIODIC TABLES

if two people sat at that table for a romantic dinner they would be carbon dating

Anonymous said: How does one find internships? Unfortunately, many of my peers are having trouble finding science-related internships, mainly ones relating to lab work, and I myself don't know where to start.

sciencesoup:

Google is your friend. Get intimate with it. There are a lot of databases/lists of internships floating around, but you usually have to dig a bit to find them.

Here’s an incomplete list of ones I’ve personally taken note of. Most are in the US or the UK, and they’re mostly available to international students. There are MANY more programs open to US and EU citizens; you guys have a lot more options.

LISTS of STEM internships/programs in all fields:

Specific STEM fields:

Astronomy and Physics

Environmental Science

Australian Programs

LISTS of Science Writing Internships:

Specific Science Writing Internships

Basically, do your research, because this is a hugely incomplete list, but hopefully this gets you started.

Spread this around! My extensive Googling skills have to be good for something.

sciencesoup:

Gel Electrophoresis
There’s a cool experiment you can do with DNA, and you only really need to know one thing: it’s a negatively charged molecule, since phosphate is negatively charged and DNA is largely made up of its sugar-phosphate backbone. The experiment is called Gel Electrophoresis, and essentially, it separates molecules based on size. Biologists use it to figure out the size of a DNA samples by seeing how far they move through a substance as compared to how far DNA fragments of known size move through the same substance.
A common substance is agarose gel, which can be easily set on a glass slide. While it’s setting, you create little wells in one end—pockets to insert your DNA into later. Usually you’ll have several samples of DNA of varying, unknown sizes combined with loading buffer, which weighs down your sample so it stays comfortably in the gel.

(Source: Wikimedia Commons)
To get started, your gel is placed into a gel electrophoresis chamber, which is essentially just a tank where you can apply a voltage and create an electric field. Running buffer is added to the tank to cover the gel, and then you insert your DNA samples into the wells. You also have a sample of DNA fragments of known size, and you usually put those on either side of your unknown samples so you can compare later.

(Source: camerazn)
When you apply a voltage across the tank, the DNA will start to move—the pores of the agarose gel act like a sieve. Since DNA is negatively charged, it will be repulsed from the negative end of the tank and migrate through the gel towards the positive end. The fragments travel parallel to each other in lanes: smaller fragments travel faster and further, and the longer fragments travel slower.
Eventually, some of the smaller molecules will have travelled all the way through the gel, and you should turn off the voltage. But at this point, you can’t clearly see where they all are, since they’re so small. So after applying a voltage, you remove the gel and stain it. Under UV light, it will be flurorescent—so voila, you can take an picture and you should see something like this:

(Source: Wikimedia Commons)
On the far left you can see the known sample, and by doing a little bit of maths and comparison, you can figure out the sizes of your DNA fragments.
Gel electrophoresis is has a bunch of applications in forensics, microbiology, genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology.
Further resources: Interactive explorations of the experiment here and here, and a more detailed look at the process from Osmania University

sciencesoup:

Gel Electrophoresis

There’s a cool experiment you can do with DNA, and you only really need to know one thing: it’s a negatively charged molecule, since phosphate is negatively charged and DNA is largely made up of its sugar-phosphate backbone. The experiment is called Gel Electrophoresis, and essentially, it separates molecules based on size. Biologists use it to figure out the size of a DNA samples by seeing how far they move through a substance as compared to how far DNA fragments of known size move through the same substance.

A common substance is agarose gel, which can be easily set on a glass slide. While it’s setting, you create little wells in one end—pockets to insert your DNA into later. Usually you’ll have several samples of DNA of varying, unknown sizes combined with loading buffer, which weighs down your sample so it stays comfortably in the gel.

image

(Source: Wikimedia Commons)

To get started, your gel is placed into a gel electrophoresis chamber, which is essentially just a tank where you can apply a voltage and create an electric field. Running buffer is added to the tank to cover the gel, and then you insert your DNA samples into the wells. You also have a sample of DNA fragments of known size, and you usually put those on either side of your unknown samples so you can compare later.

image

(Source: camerazn)

When you apply a voltage across the tank, the DNA will start to move—the pores of the agarose gel act like a sieve. Since DNA is negatively charged, it will be repulsed from the negative end of the tank and migrate through the gel towards the positive end. The fragments travel parallel to each other in lanes: smaller fragments travel faster and further, and the longer fragments travel slower.

Eventually, some of the smaller molecules will have travelled all the way through the gel, and you should turn off the voltage. But at this point, you can’t clearly see where they all are, since they’re so small. So after applying a voltage, you remove the gel and stain it. Under UV light, it will be flurorescent—so voila, you can take an picture and you should see something like this:

image

(Source: Wikimedia Commons)

On the far left you can see the known sample, and by doing a little bit of maths and comparison, you can figure out the sizes of your DNA fragments.

Gel electrophoresis is has a bunch of applications in forensics, microbiology, genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology.

Further resources: Interactive explorations of the experiment here and here, and a more detailed look at the process from Osmania University

“Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.”

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


I LOVE IT

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

I LOVE IT

thisfuturemd:

hitchedand24:

Maybe if I had a teacher like this I would have liked science more.

#imsodone

thisfuturemd:

hitchedand24:

Maybe if I had a teacher like this I would have liked science more.

#imsodone

mellograma:

I thought that the Chemistry degree would be something like

image

but it’s more like

image

kqedscience:

Female Scientist LEGOs Will Soon Be Coming To A Store Near You
“Today in exciting LEGO news: The toy brand has announced that they will release a Female Minifigure Set that will include chemists, astronomers, and paleontologists.
The project, submitted by Dr. Ellen Kooijman, was selected as a LEGO Ideas winner and will be released in August 2014.”
Read more from the huffingtonpost.

kqedscience:

Female Scientist LEGOs Will Soon Be Coming To A Store Near You

Today in exciting LEGO news: The toy brand has announced that they will release a Female Minifigure Set that will include chemists, astronomers, and paleontologists.

The project, submitted by Dr. Ellen Kooijman, was selected as a LEGO Ideas winner and will be released in August 2014.”

Read more from the huffingtonpost.

brains-and-bodies:

doctorsurgeonator:

So on the first day of my second-semester organic chemistry class, my professor brings this up: Morphine and a few small substitutions can make codeine or heroin. Neat! Also, morphine itself is a crazy/beautiful fucking molecule.

The power of subtle changes my friends

brains-and-bodies:

doctorsurgeonator:

So on the first day of my second-semester organic chemistry class, my professor brings this up: Morphine and a few small substitutions can make codeine or heroin. Neat! Also, morphine itself is a crazy/beautiful fucking molecule.

The power of subtle changes my friends

bloomersuit:

womenrockscience:

Beatrix Potter did way more than write children’s books.
Sources: V&A, Linnean, Scientist, AU Fungi

Beatrix Potter is my hero.

bloomersuit:

womenrockscience:

Beatrix Potter did way more than write children’s books.

Sources: V&A, Linnean, Scientist, AU Fungi

Beatrix Potter is my hero.