dumb-science-jokes:

scotlandvevo:

my AVOGADRO DONT WANT NUN UNLESS YOU GOT MOLES HUN

My avagadro don’t want none unless you 6.0221

(Source: spoopyscience)

found-liquorstore-and-drank-itt:

ohmykarma:

miscreantive:

onlylolgifs:

Giant Gummi Bear dropped into boiling Potassium Chlorate

YES

I love his reaction

like, “Yeah bitches we gonna do some sciOH SHIT TOO MUCH SCIENCE ABORT ABORT FUCK”

TOO MUCH SCIENCE 

tiny-little-dot:

allthingshyper:

gehayi:

hiddlesbatchlove:

forever-falling-forward:

platredeparis:

bnycolew:

mannysiege:

Progress

What

Imma just let this sit here

MOTHA FUCKIN SCIENCE

sources:

Engagdget

DailyTech

CBS

They turned RNA into an anti-virus program. That is amazing.

Let me restate this in case it didn’t sink in the first time

Researchers physically DELETED ALL TRACES of the HIV virus from a human cell.

ALL OF IT.

IF YOU ARE NOT EXCITED ABOUT THAT I DON’T THINK YOU KNOW WHAT HIV IS

holy shit this is glorious

(Source: mannysiege)

luminescent-love:

youaresogayskarth:

finnickodaired:

barackinaroundthechristmastree:

WHAT COLOR ARE MIRRORS

let’s reflect on this

fun fact! mirrors reflect each color equally, except for green. if you have ever seen a mirror perfectly aligned in front of another mirror, a.k.a. an infinite mirror, you can look through it and see that it becomes greener and greener. therefore, mirrors are technically green!

holy shit

(Source: partybarackisinthehousetonight)

asapscience:

edwardspoonhands:

Also, that Cat’s periodic table is missing an entire row, and it’s model of the atom is woefully out of date. Pusheen the Cat, more like Pusheen the limits of scientific accuracy!

lol

(Source: noradrenaline)

23pairsofchromosomes:

The chemistry behind why we smell

We all have either know people who produce these odour molecules or have experienced them first hand from ourselves. These molecules are typically the by products of bacterial activity on the body as they break down the wide variety of organic products we secrete. 

nprglobalhealth:

No, Seriously, How Contagious Is Ebola?

Holy moly! There’s a case of Ebola in the U.S.!

That first reaction was understandable. There’s no question the disease is scary. The World Health Organization now estimates that the virus has killed about 70 percent of people infected in West Africa.

The Ebola case in Dallas is the first one diagnosed outside Africa, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. And the health care system in Texas didn’t quarantine the man right away. He was sick with Ebola — and contagious — for four days before he was admitted to the hospital.

But when you look at health officials responding to the case in Dallas, they seem cool as cucumbers, despite the initial misstep.

"I have no doubt that we will control this importation, or case, of Ebola so that it does not spread widely in this country," said the director of the CDC, Dr. Tom Frieden.

Why is Frieden so sure this virus won’t spread beyond a handful of cases?

It boils down to something called “R0.”

The reproduction number, or “R nought,” is a mathematical term that tells you how contagious an infectious disease is. Specifically, it’s the number of people who catch the disease from one sick person, on average, in an outbreak.*

Take, for example, measles. The virus is one of the most contagious diseases known to man. It’s R0 sits around 18. That means each person with the measles spreads it to 18 people, on average, when nobody is vaccinated. (When everyone is vaccinated, the R0 drops to essentially zero for measles).

Continue reading.

Image by Adam Cole/NPR

The R0 of measles is why the anti-vaccination movement is so scary in the US. The movement is leading to increased cases of measles, especially in vulnerable segments of the population such as young children. 

While the US has kind of gotten a lucky break due to the R0 of Ebola, the disease is so scary because of its average case fatality rate of 50%. So even though there many only be a handful of cases in the US right now, statistically half of the individuals affected will die. And it’s why around 70% of infected individuals have died in the African countries affected by Ebola.

Really informative piece by NPR that shows more complexity of the epidemiology of Ebola and other diseases. 

"I don’t think that everyone should become a mathematician, but I do believe that many students don’t give mathematics a real chance. I did poorly in math for a couple of years in middle school; I was just not interested in thinking about it.
I can see that without being excited mathematics can look pointless and cold. The beauty of mathematics only shows itself to more patient followers."
Interview with Maryam Mirzakhani, the brilliant Iranian mathematician who was the first woman to win the Fields Medal (via curiosamathematica)
scienceisbeauty:

Gifs That Teach You Science Concepts (via From Quarks to Quasars)

scienceisbeauty:

Gifs That Teach You Science Concepts (via From Quarks to Quasars)

kqedscience:

Stanford University Biologist Explains the Science Behind Captain America & the Hulk’s Amazing Superpowers

Stanford University biologist Sebastian Alvarado recently jumped into the world of comic books to explain the science behind both Captain America and the Hulk‘s amazing superpowers. More on Alvarado’s studies is available at the Stanford News website.”

(via laughingsquid)

laboratoryequipment:

Jell-O-like Substance Attracts, Kills Cancer Cells

Chasing cancer cells with chemotherapy drugs can save lives, but there’s no guarantee that the treatment will kill every run-away cancer cell in the body.

What if, instead of hunting those metastatic cells, a treatment could lure them out of hiding — every last one of them — and eliminate them in one swift blow? Yong Wang, associate professor of bioengineering at Penn State, has created such a therapy — a tissue-like biomaterial that attracts cancer cells, like bits of metal to a magnet, and entraps them.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/jell-o-substance-attracts-kills-cancer-cells

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/5
  3. Exposure: 1/100th
  4. Focal Length: 31mm

historical-nonfiction:

In February 1935, a chimpanzee at London Zoo called Boo-Boo gave birth to a baby daughter. A couple of months later, a little blonde-haired girl was given a soft-toy replica of the zoo’s new arrival to mark her first birthday. This was Jane Goodall’s first recorded encounter with a chimp.

iamtemporarytoday:

teatray-inthesky:

comicsncoolshit:

a bubble freezing at -10º F degrees

THIS IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING I HAVE EVER VIRTUALLY WITNESSED

degrees fahrenheit degrees

iamtemporarytoday:

teatray-inthesky:

comicsncoolshit:

a bubble freezing at -10º F degrees

THIS IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING I HAVE EVER VIRTUALLY WITNESSED

degrees fahrenheit degrees

kqedscience:

Sweat-powered battery could charge your phone

A sweaty gym workout is not only good for your health - it could also energise your phone.

A tattoo that produces power from perspiration has been unveiled at the American Chemical Society meeting.

The biobattery is fuelled by lactate - which is naturally present in sweat after vigorous exercise.

It could soon power heart monitors, digital watches and eventually even smartphones, say scientists in California.”

Read more from bbcnews.

neeta-inari:

wandonthewing:

coolandfroody:

dustedsunshine:

campdracula5eva:

girlinfourcolors:

atomstargazer:

Teen creates bio-plastic from banana peels

Sixteen-year-old Elif Bilgin of Turkey has developed a way to replace traditional petroleum-based plastic with banana peels.

The Turkish teen took home a US$50,000 prize for her project “Go Bananas!” Thursday after winning the second annual Scientific American Science in Action Award, associated with Google Science Fair.

“My project makes it possible to use banana peels, a waste material which is thrown away almost every day, in the electrical insulation of cables,” Bilgin said in a media statement.

“This is both an extremely nature-friendly and cheap process, which has the potential to decrease the amount of pollution created due to the use of plastics, which contain petroleum derivatives.”

Bilgin spent two years developing the bio-plastic, which does not decay. She said the process is so easy that it is possible to repeat at home, with special care taken for chemicals used in the production process.

In September, the teen will compete at Google’s California headquarters for the overall Google Science Fair prize for 15-to-16 year olds. She will also have access to a one-year mentorship.

Has anyone else noticed how many brilliant breakthroughs in science are coming from the minds of teenage girls the last few years? Between this story, the four girls in Nigeria who invented a generator that runs on urine, the California girl who invented a twenty-second cell phone charger… Who knows where we’d be today without the patriarchal interference of men, stealing or hiding the brilliance of women?

Our future is in the hands of teenage girls, and I for one feel really good about that.

When I was about 7 I wanted to invent a thing that purified water based off of fish gills. I went to the school library to do research like a good little inventor and one of my teachers asked me what I was doing, and then told me that there were some new barbie books in, and that I’d probably be better off with those.

Don’t forget the girl who invented a torch that’d light up just from the heat of your hands

basically everyone should stop s***ting on teenage girls because they do awesome things when you let them

or that one time a girl found the cure for cancer that we could be using in 15 years

Is that link to the girl who taught herself to code and created a program that can detect breast cancer more accurately than a mammogram?

also notable: it’s black and brown girls inventing all this world-changing stuff.

(Source: thinkcosmos)