twotwentyonebbakerst:

hit-it-and-quidditch:

allthingshyper:

ionosphere-negate:

le-claire-de-lune:

crowdog66:

smellslikegirlriot:

If you are reading this, thank this woman. Her name is Grace Hopper, and she is one of the most under appreciated computer scientists ever. You think Gates and Jobs were cool? THIS WOMAN WORKED ON COMPUTERS WHEN THEY TOOK UP ROOMS. She invented the first compiler, which is a program that translates a computer language like Java or C++ into machine code, called assembly, that can be read by a processor. Every single program you use, every OS and server, was made possible by her first compiler.

Spread the word! (Although I’ll bet there are still some dudebros out there who’ll claim she’s a “fake geek”…)

Favorite fact: She coined the term “debugging” when they had to remove an moth (an actual, living moth) that had gotten trapped in the Mark II computer at Harvard University in 1947. While referring to glitches as bugs existed before, she brought the term into popularity. 

She also got the trend of personal computers going with her suggestion to the DoD to use more smaller units rather than one big one.

Please explain to me why I never knew about her before?

you know why

they also have a women in computer science convention named after her every year. this year’s is in phoenix, arizona, in early october, and i urge you to take the opportunity to go, if possible. my university, for example, granted scholarships for some students who applied to go, all expenses paid, and many companies and schools do the same.

twotwentyonebbakerst:

hit-it-and-quidditch:

allthingshyper:

ionosphere-negate:

le-claire-de-lune:

crowdog66:

smellslikegirlriot:

If you are reading this, thank this woman. Her name is Grace Hopper, and she is one of the most under appreciated computer scientists ever. You think Gates and Jobs were cool? THIS WOMAN WORKED ON COMPUTERS WHEN THEY TOOK UP ROOMS. She invented the first compiler, which is a program that translates a computer language like Java or C++ into machine code, called assembly, that can be read by a processor. Every single program you use, every OS and server, was made possible by her first compiler.

Spread the word! (Although I’ll bet there are still some dudebros out there who’ll claim she’s a “fake geek”…)

Favorite fact: She coined the term “debugging” when they had to remove an moth (an actual, living moth) that had gotten trapped in the Mark II computer at Harvard University in 1947. While referring to glitches as bugs existed before, she brought the term into popularity. 

She also got the trend of personal computers going with her suggestion to the DoD to use more smaller units rather than one big one.

Please explain to me why I never knew about her before?

you know why

they also have a women in computer science convention named after her every year. this year’s is in phoenix, arizona, in early october, and i urge you to take the opportunity to go, if possible. my university, for example, granted scholarships for some students who applied to go, all expenses paid, and many companies and schools do the same.

fromgrapevine:

7 intriguing things you didn’t know about the Dead Sea
The still, dense waters of the Dead Sea have mystified people for thousands of years — yet there are many things we do know about the Dead Sea, and most of them may surprise you.

barack-obottm:

when your science teacher hands you back a bad test grade

image

(Source: proud-atheist)

kabutocub:

fujl:

bearcubjay:

kabutocub:

Ok, so I figured that perhaps not everyone is aware that this is available to use now, especially the younger folk out there.

This is OraQuick, and it is an FDA-Approved, in-home HIV test that provides results in about 20 minutes. I’m not sure about the availabilty of this product (or similar ones) in other countries, but in the U.S. you can purchase these at Walgreens for a mere 35 bucks, and you can even have them delivered to your door for complete anonymity.

Reading the results is easy. One line you are negative, two lines you are positive.

image

Why is this important? Well I know for a fact that a lot of guys say they are HIV negative without really getting tested, or they base that on some really old test result. There is no excuse now. You can get this in the mail if you want, and know for sure in the comfort and privacy of your own home. Its good peace of mind. And if you meet someone new and you are planning on playing around, its an easy and cheap thing to do to know where you guys stand. It builds trust right off the bat. Being safe is not just about wearing a condom. Its a combination of many things like trust, knowing the person, closeness, and being a good judge of character. Now on top of that you can keep up with your HIV status on a regular basis. :)

This is important for people to know, I never knew it existed

This is how my boyfriend and I tested before we started bareback in together after being with each other for 3 months. It’s super easy.

I know that it’s scary, believe me, I don’t practice risky behaviors and my anxiety was through the roof. It’s so important though you guys.

They even give you a non-descript bag to dispose of everything in.

I’m glad this is going around. :) Spread the word.

mindblowingscience:

CROWS BEAT TEST THAT STUMPS LITTLE KIDS

In Aesop’s fable about the crow and the pitcher, a thirsty bird finds a vessel of water, but when he tries to drink from it, he finds that the water level is too low. Not strong enough to knock over the pitcher, the bird drops pebbles into it—one at a time—until the water level rises enough for him to drink his fill.
Highlighting the value of ingenuity, the fable demonstrates that cognitive ability can often be more effective than brute force. It also characterizes crows as pretty resourceful problem solvers.
New research conducted by University of California, Santa Barbara’s Corina Logan and collaborators proves the birds’ intellectual prowess may be more fact than fiction. The findings appear in PLOS ONE.
“We showed that crows can discriminate between different volumes of water and that they can pass a modified test that so far only 7- to 10-year-old children have been able to complete successfully,” says Logan, who is lead author of the paper.
“We provide the strongest evidence so far that the birds attend to cause-and-effect relationships by choosing options that displace more water.”

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

CROWS BEAT TEST THAT STUMPS LITTLE KIDS

In Aesop’s fable about the crow and the pitcher, a thirsty bird finds a vessel of water, but when he tries to drink from it, he finds that the water level is too low. Not strong enough to knock over the pitcher, the bird drops pebbles into it—one at a time—until the water level rises enough for him to drink his fill.

Highlighting the value of ingenuity, the fable demonstrates that cognitive ability can often be more effective than brute force. It also characterizes crows as pretty resourceful problem solvers.

New research conducted by University of California, Santa Barbara’s Corina Logan and collaborators proves the birds’ intellectual prowess may be more fact than fiction. The findings appear in PLOS ONE.

“We showed that crows can discriminate between different volumes of water and that they can pass a modified test that so far only 7- to 10-year-old children have been able to complete successfully,” says Logan, who is lead author of the paper.

“We provide the strongest evidence so far that the birds attend to cause-and-effect relationships by choosing options that displace more water.”

Continue Reading.

xysciences:

Scientists have created the world’s darkest material. Vantablack. 
Vantablack absorbs 99.965% of all visual light. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

Scientists have created the world’s darkest material. Vantablack. 

Vantablack absorbs 99.965% of all visual light. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

sweetteascience:

mindblowingscience:

New fellowship for gender equity in science

Australia’s first major fellowship designed to help scientists build their careers after taking time off to look after their children has been launched at The Australian National University (ANU).

The Judith Whitworth Fellowship for Gender Equality in Science has been established by the John Curtin School of Medical Research (JCSMR) at the ANU. It offers support for early- to mid-career scientists who have experienced significant career disruption as a result of maternity or parental leave.

Dr Julia Ellyard, a medical researcher and the chair of the JCSMR equity committee, said the Fellowship sent a strong signal that women had an important contribution to make to science.

“I think that this Fellowship provides hope for myself and my colleagues in a similar position, that there is a way to maintain your career over this difficult period when you are trying to balance the demands of a young family and get your research up and going again,” Dr Ellyard said.

Women who become parents or plan to have children abandon research careers up to twice as often as men in similar circumstances.

ACT Chief Minister Katy Gallagher launched the Fellowship and said the contribution made by these scientists was critical to maintaining scientific capability in research in Australia.

“It’s important to look at ways to minimize the impact that a career break can have,” she said.

The Fellowship is merit based and will provide up to two years of salary, plus research support of up to $50,000 for the successful candidate to re-establish scientific projects, strengthen their track record and regain national and international competitiveness when applying for independent external research funding.

The Fellowship is named in honour of Professor Judith Whitworth, past director of The John Curtin School of Medical Research.

“Gender equity is an important pillar of social justice,” Professor Whitworth said. “Female education and participation relates to the health of society, economic development, productivity and social stability.”

The Fellowship will be supported by The John Curtin School of Medical Research, The John Curtin Medical Research Foundation, and ANU Workplace giving program.

The first Fellowship is expected to start in January next year.

This is an awesome step. Way to lead the way Australia.